Published Articles

Tuesday, February 17, 1998

Dr. Miguel Faria is very proud of his adopted the United States of America. He's equally as proud to have received the Americanism medal and certificate from the Daughters of the American Revolution last month.

Faria, a native of Cuba, moved to Macon in 1983 after completing his training in neurosurgery at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta. He moved to Macon to work as a neurosurgeon at Coliseum Medical Centers. When he came to interview at the hospital, Faria said he saw a bumper sticker on a car that read, "Freedom with Responsibility." Then he saw the same sticker on another car. That was a sign to him that Macon was the place he should be, he said.

Faria is a noted neurosurgeon who edits journals, publishes and is the author of two books, Vandals at the Gates of Medicine and Medical Warrior. However, it was his devotion to community service --- and particularly his love of American history --- that caught the attention of the DAR.

(Pictured above: Mrs. Anne McKinley, Regent, Nathaniel Macon Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) presents Americanism Medal to Dr. Miguel A. Faria, Jr.)

The...

Keyword(s): history


Friday, August 15, 1997

Despite all the media hullabaloo about a growing medical marketplace and the supposedly conservative changes being brought about by the November 1994 Republican revolution, corporate socialized medicine is making headway and becoming a reality, step-by-step, under the rubric of managed care and a mislabeled "free market."

The fact is we still face an ominous threat from those who seek to destroy the noble profession of medicine, enslave the healers, and dispose of those whose quality of life they deem not worth living.

The supremacy of the patient-doctor relationship, and the ability of physicians to do all they can for their patients is being increasingly challenged (and likely will continue to be challenged in the uncertain future of the 21st century), unless we prevail in derailing the juggernaut of managed care/HMO and corporatism.

Today, many of the major health care corporations with their burgeoning networks are acting in collusion with government bureaucrats to impose managed care and to subvert the time-honored ethics of the medical profession. Where once the supreme medical ethic dictated that physicians place their individual patients' interest...



Sunday, June 1, 1997

As we ponder the destructive changes unfolding today in health care and medical practice, we find ourselves questioning whether the government push and attempted takeover of the health care industry was truly repulsed by the American people following the consummation of the great health care debate of 1993 and 1994.

Despite all the media hullabaloo about a growing medical marketplace and the supposedly conservative changes brought about by the November 1994 Republican revolution, corporate socialized medicine is making headway, becoming a reality, step-by-step under the rubric of managed care and a mislabeled "free market." The fact is that we still face an ominous threat from those who seek to destroy the noble profession of medicine, enslave the healers, and dispose of those whose quality of life they deem not worth living.

The supremacy of the patient-doctor relationship, and the ability of physicians, including practicing dermatologists, to do all they can for their patients is being increasingly challenged (and likely will continue to be challenged in the uncertain future of the 21st Century), unless we prevail in derailing the juggernaut of managed...



Monday, September 30, 1996

A major engagement in the war over the right to keep and bear arms was fought in the House of Representatives this past July. The House voted to shift $2.6 million away from the National Centers for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) - a research unit of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) - and earmark the funds for other health research projects. The funding was equivalent to the amount spent by the NCIPC in its campaign to redefine guns as "first and foremost, a public health menace."

In a letter to House colleagues, Representative Jay Dickey (R-AR), who sponsored the amendment to redirect the NCIPC funding, explained that "NCIPC's director of the division of violence preventionhas this to say about the political agenda at NCIPC: "What we have to do is find a socially acceptable form of gun control." In a letter to Senator Arlen Spector (R-PA), who chairs the Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education of the Senate Appropriations Committee, several senators who support the effort to curtail NCIPC's anti-gun activities noted NCIPC Director Mark Rosenberg's vision of "a long-term campaignto convince Americans that guns are, first and foremost,...



Friday, March 15, 1996

The book, Vandals at the Gates of Medicine by Miguel A. Faria, Jr., M.D., is extremely interesting and unusual as it takes you through the history of primitive medicine, from the Ice Age 40,000 years ago to the Renaissance, in an attempt to solve the battle over health care reform that is now taking place.

The author speculates that organized medical care was needed, and is hypothetical about the first blunt head injury (the author is a neurosurgeon). That man recognized “the need for the care of the wounded in his clan and when he became ill from imbibing the stagnant water of a polluted pond, he also recognized the need to be provided with aid and comfort during sickness — and to be nurtured back to health.” These witch doctors had a tremendous amount of prestige and power within the tribe and were respected, as the survival of the tribe depended on them.

The author now takes the reader to the Egyptian physicians in the fifth century B.C. by quoting Herodotus, a great historian: “The art of medicine is thus divided among them. Each physician applies himself to only one disease, and no more.” Apparently, there was specialization in those days....



Thursday, June 1, 1995

"Violence in America — Effective Soutions" by Suter EA, Waters WC, Murray GB, et al. was originally published in the Journal of the Medical Association of Georgia, Volume 85, June 1995, pp 253-263 while Dr. Miguel A. Faria served as Editor-in-Chief of that medical journal. The following link is provided for readers who wish to read the entire article: http://rkba.org/research/suter/violence.html.



Wednesday, May 3, 1995

And I looked, and behold, a pale horse; and his name that sat on him was Death.
Revelation 6:8

At the peak of his reign in A.D. 540, after accomplishing major political, judicial, and military successes, Justinian’s empire was struck by the old enemy of mankind, one that not even Justinian could conquer: pestilential disease. The bubonic plague, which struck with a vengeance in A.D. 540, is justifiably the worst recorded pandemic to ever afflict humanity. Records regarding the dimensions of the devastation, suffering, and death were carefully kept by Justinian’s chief archivist, secretary and historian, Procopius....

At the time the horrible plague struck, Justinian was engaged in a war that was being waged fiercely on two fronts. We have already described the military feats of his armies as they battled the remnants of the Germanic tribes in the West. But during the years A.D. 541 and 542, Justinian was also engaged in the East fighting the recalcitrant Parthians....

If we think of the dimensions of the devastation of the bubonic plague of the 6th Century in the midst of the Dark Ages—the savage imperial wars waged against...



Sunday, April 2, 1995

It is the free mind and individual responsibility, the principles of the Renaissance that have brought us the wonders of modern health care through the free-market capitalist system and through the inventiveness of the free minds it has raised. It seems we are now going to harness the capitalist engine for rationing....

It seems that we in America are about to embark on an accelerated venture of harnessing the capitalist engine for the destruction of healing.... For instance, the terms managed competition we hear in all these proposals, by sleight of words say the opposite of what they mean. It is competition in management we should be speaking of.... It is the loss of philosophical concepts, the loss of the spirit of free will and individual responsibility represented in these schemes, together with conceptual muddle-headedness which are sounding the death knell to the philosophy of our civilization.(1)

Thomas A. Dorman, M.D.

As we further reflect on what transpired during the health care reform debate of 1993 and 1994, we must realize more than just changes in the U.S. health...



Wednesday, March 15, 1995

According to an old Cuban proverb, "Camarón que se duerme, se lo lleva la corriente" (shrimp that sleep are swept away by the current). Some physicians may find Dr. Faria's wake-up call as welcome as a blast of Arctic wind. In his view, the current policy of most medical organizations --- "nonconfrontation and cooperation" --- could make them, in effect, accomplices of the barbarians.

From Faria's historic perspective, the currents that some consider the wave of the future are as old as the Code of Hammurabi. Because of the threat of severe government reprisals, the most knowledgeable physicians in the civilized world at that time recommended against treating patients --- the ultimate "defensive medicine."

As an example of a leader who forestalled imminent collapse in a time of crisis, Faria points to Diocletian. Although he subdued military enemies and reestablished law and order, his domestic "reforms" accelerated the corrosion of the foundations of the Roman Republic. Diocletian abrogated codified laws and installed an overbearing centralized government that overrode the rights of citizens and local governors. The specific remedies are familiar: wage and price...



Wednesday, March 1, 1995

The world owes all its onward impulses to men ill at ease.
The happy man inevitably confines himself within ancient limits.

Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864)

On Managed Care And Cutting-Edge Technology

In the wake of the epochal November1994 elections that swept conservatives to power, and hopefully a new philosophy of health reform—viz, economic incentives to promote healthy lifestyles and the pursuit of longevity—it is appropriate and relevant we discuss the new vistas of opportunities for cutting-edge technologies in the biomedical industries and the potential impediments to health progress.

Despite the presently available medical networks for communication via Cybermedix and the Information Superhighway, the greatest impediment to this “state of the art” technology reaching clinical medicine and patients any time soon, remains the present atmosphere of cost controls, covert rationing of medical care, and litigation- (of individual physicians, not the networks which are shielded) on-demand.

Managed competition—the prevailing philosophy of health care delivery with its centerpiece,...