Galen

Another medical journey to ancient Rome and Roman medicine with medical historian Plinio Prioreschi, MD, PhD

Journal/Website: 
Surgical Neurology International
Article Type: 
Book Review
Published Date: 
Monday, June 15, 2015

This is the third volume of the monumental A History of Medicine series by the medical historian and classical scholar Plinio Prioreschi M.D., PhD.[1] A limited number of these books were published, and the reader would be fortunate to find copies of the tomes for less than $350 U.S. dollars. We have already reviewed Volume I: Primitive and Ancient Medicine (2nd edition, 1995) and Volume II: Greek Medicine (2nd edition, 1996).[2,3] We found both of these tomes to be excellent journeys to the history of medicine (and indirectly medical ethics).

Violence, mental illness, and the brain — A brief history of psychosurgery: Part 1 — From trephination to lobotomy

Journal/Website: 
Surgical Neurology International
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Friday, April 5, 2013
Source: 
http://surgicalneurologyint.com/surgicalint_articles/violence-mental-illness-and-the-brain-a-brief-history-of-psychosurgery-part-1-from-trephination-to-lobotomy/

Abstract — Psychosurgery was developed early in human prehistory (trephination) as a need perhaps to alter aberrant behavior and treat mental illness. The “American Crowbar Case" provided an impetus to study the brain and human behavior. The frontal lobe syndrome was avidly studied. Frontal lobotomy was developed in the 1930s for the treatment of mental illness and to solve the pressing problem of overcrowding in mental institutions in an era when no other forms of effective treatment were available. Lobotomy popularized by Dr.

The Serpent on the Staff: The Unhealthy Politics of the American Medical Association by Howard Wolinsky and Tom Brune

Author: 
Reviewed by Jerome C. Arnett, Jr., MD, FCCP
Article Type: 
Book Review
Issue: 
Summer 1996
Volume Number: 
1
Issue Number: 
2

Written by two reporters, this book contains a wealth of information about the history and inner workings of the American Medical Association since its founding in 1847. It is divided into two parts. The first covers how the AMA is organized, the history of its development, its ongoing battle against compulsory health insurance, a description of its political action committee (AMPAC), and a discussion of its support for the business ethic. The second covers the AMA's response to health issues including alternative medicine, the tobacco problem, abortion, and the AIDS epidemic.

The Hippocratic Oath, Abortion, Greek Homosexuality, and the Courts

Author: 
Plinio Prioreschi, MD, PhD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
Spring 1997
Volume Number: 
2
Issue Number: 
2


The Hippocratic Oath, Abortion, and the U.S. Supreme Court