medical ethics

History in Medicine

Author: 
Plinio Prioreschi, MD, PhD
Article Type: 
Correspondence
Issue: 
Winter 1997
Volume Number: 
2
Issue Number: 
1

Dear Dr. Faria,

On the Moral Virtues and Evolving Professional Ethics

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Editor's Corner
Issue: 
Spring 1996
Volume Number: 
1
Issue Number: 
1

Rapid transition characterizes the ethical revolution
that appears to be at the doorstep of the 21st century.
Dramatic shifts in technology and
communication potential are anticipated.
Increasingly diverse beliefs and value systems,
which make defining a moral framework difficult
,
are the order of the day...
Moral Responsibility in the 21st century:
The Status of Ethics in the Professions,
Alumni course (Philosophy A-122),
Summer Session, 1995, Emory University.

The Serpent on the Staff: The Unhealthy Politics of the American Medical Association by Howard Wolinsky and Tom Brune

Author: 
Reviewed by Jerome C. Arnett, Jr., MD, FCCP
Article Type: 
Book Review
Issue: 
Summer 1996
Volume Number: 
1
Issue Number: 
2

Written by two reporters, this book contains a wealth of information about the history and inner workings of the American Medical Association since its founding in 1847. It is divided into two parts. The first covers how the AMA is organized, the history of its development, its ongoing battle against compulsory health insurance, a description of its political action committee (AMPAC), and a discussion of its support for the business ethic. The second covers the AMA's response to health issues including alternative medicine, the tobacco problem, abortion, and the AIDS epidemic.

To the Tune of Washington's Pied Pipers

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Editor's Corner
Issue: 
Fall 1996
Volume Number: 
1
Issue Number: 
3

In A.D. 1212, a Children's Crusade was formed allegedly
to rescue the Holy Sepulcher. Instead, the children were
lured and sold into slavery by unscrupulous and cruel
traders. Thousands of innocent children died of hunger
and disease and from their brutal ordeal. It is said that
the legend of the Pied Piper of Hamelin, who led
the children by the tune of his pipe,
derives from this dreadful affair.

Medical Ethics in the AMA and AAPS

Author: 
Franklin E. Payne, MD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
Spring 1997
Volume Number: 
2
Issue Number: 
2

The American Medical Association (AMA) has become a chameleon in its medical ethics. Examples abound. Long after the cancer- and other disease-causing effects of cigarettes were known, the AMA continued to accept money from tobacco, even promoting particular brands.(1) Not until 1981 did the AMA finally sell investments in tobacco stocks under heavy pressure from the news media and anti-tobacco groups of young physicians.

The Hippocratic Oath, Abortion, Greek Homosexuality, and the Courts

Author: 
Plinio Prioreschi, MD, PhD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
Spring 1997
Volume Number: 
2
Issue Number: 
2


The Hippocratic Oath, Abortion, and the U.S. Supreme Court

Medical Warrior --- Fighting Corporate Socialized Medicine by Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD

Author: 
Reviewed by Jerome C. Arnett, Jr., MD, FCCP
Article Type: 
Book Review
Issue: 
Fall 1997
Volume Number: 
2
Issue Number: 
4

Because of the recent decline in our health care system, today's physicians practice in a "medical gulag" and suffer from a "siege mentality." The reasons for this, as learned from examples in both ancient and recent history, are the topics for this unique collection of essays which are divided into five sections: "lessons from history"; "medical ecology"; "towards collectivism in medicine"; "the role of public health"; and "managed care, corporate socialized medicine and medical ethics." The author, Miguel A.

Transformation of Medical Ethics Through Time (Part I): Medical Ethics and Statist Controls

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
January/February 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
1

In matters of style, swim with the current;
in matters of principle, stand firm like a rock.

Thomas Jefferson

The Corporate Practice of Medicine

Transformation of Medical Ethics Through Time (Part II): Medical Ethics and Organized Medicine

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
March/April 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
2

The physician should be contemptuous of money, interested in his work,
self-controlled, and just. Once he is possessed of these basic virtues,
he will have all others at his command as well.

Galen

 

Can the Medical Profession Survive Flexible Ethics?*

The Oath of Hippocrates --- Is It Relevant?

Author: 
Franklin E. Payne, MD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
March/April 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
2

The crisis of American medicine is not tobacco, AIDS, silicone implants, the Gulf War Syndrome, breast or other forms of cancer, physician-assisted suicide, euthanasia, licensure, medical care for the poor, or any other specific medical or ethical issue. The crisis of American medicine is far greater than any one of these problems, indeed it is far greater than all of them combined, because the answers to these problems do not come from within them but from medical ethics.

Euthanasia, Medical Science, and the Road to Genocide

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Editor's Corner
Issue: 
May/June 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
3

A momentous article, "Medical Science Under Dictatorship," by Dr. Leo Alexander, the Chief U.S. Medical Consultant at the Nuremberg War Crimes Trials, first printed in the July 14, 1949 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine, has been reprinted as a monograph, and it could not have been reprinted at a more opportune moment.

Transformation of Medical Ethics Through Time

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Correspondence
Issue: 
July/August 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
4

October 7, 1997

Dear Dr. Annis:

[Regarding "The Transformation of Medical Ethics Through Time" (Medical Sentinel, Vol. 3, # 1-2, 1997) which I gave in part as a speech to the American Society of Dermatology (ASD) last year in San Antonio, Texas]... I admit I was highly critical of the AMA and organized medicine. Unfortunately, it is all true and I wish I did not have to say it. Sadly, I have it all well documented. In fact, most of it is quite detailed in my new book, Medical Warrior: Fighting Corporate Socialized Medicine.

Onward To Obscurantism!

Author: 
Plinio Prioreschi, MD, PhD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
September/October 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
5

*This article is excerpted from the Foreword of Dr. Prioreschi's latest volume (Vol. III --- Roman Medicine) of his A History of Medicine, released this year.(1)

The Exit Interview

Author: 
Lawrence R. Huntoon, MD, PhD
Article Type: 
Medical Ethics and Managed Care
Issue: 
January/February 1999
Volume Number: 
4
Issue Number: 
1

The year is 2025. In an attempt to understand the tragic demise of American medicine in the tradition of Hippocrates, we look back on the course of events around the turn of the century.

Boundary Violations --- Gun Politics in the Doctor's Office

Author: 
Timothy Wheeler, MD
Article Type: 
Editorial
Issue: 
March/April 1999
Volume Number: 
4
Issue Number: 
2

Imagine this scenario: you visit your doctor for back pain. Your doctor asks if you have firearms in your home. Then he announces that your family would be better off (especially your children) if you had no guns at all in your house. You leave the doctor's office feeling uneasy, wondering what guns have to do with your backache. Does your doctor care about your family's safety? Or instead, did he use your trust and his authority to advance a political agenda?

The Cost-Effectiveness of Killing: An Overview of Nazi "Euthanasia"

Author: 
John E. Gardella, MD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
July/August 1999
Volume Number: 
4
Issue Number: 
4

In the public debate over legalized euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide, opponents of such measures often invoke the history of medicine in Nazi Germany as an example of the danger in these practices. Those who invoke the "Nazi analogy" suggest that the sanctioning of euthanasia could lead to the wholesale destruction of those whose lives are deemed valueless or burdensome to society.

Bad Ethics Is Not For the Patient's Good

Author: 
Jerome C. Arnett, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Commentary
Issue: 
September/October 1999
Volume Number: 
4
Issue Number: 
5

"When I use a word," Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone,
"it means just what I choose it to mean --- neither more nor less."
"The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words
mean so many different things."

Lewis Carroll
Through The Looking Glass

Slouching Towards a Duty to Die

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., M.D.
Article Type: 
Editor's Corner
Issue: 
November/December 1999
Volume Number: 
4
Issue Number: 
6

An article in the New Oxford Review illustrates how " 'a right to die' easily becomes 'a duty to die' once society labels some lives as not worth living." Two case histories were briefly outlined. In one instance, Harold Cybulski, visited by his family while in his hospital bed in Ontario, Canada, wakes up from a coma just as his physicians were about to " 'pull the plug and let him go.' As the grieving family filed in, Cybulski's two-year-old grandson ran ahead crying, 'Grandpa!

Futility of Care Guidelines and The Killing Fields of the Future

Author: 
Lawrence R. Huntoon, MD, PhD
Article Type: 
Medical Ethics and Managed Care
Issue: 
November/December 1999
Volume Number: 
4
Issue Number: 
6

It is no coincidence that the debate over physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia has arisen at a time when managed care has been forced on employees and socialized medicine is being surreptitiously implemented in a piecemeal fashion in our country. There has been increasing talk of a "right to die" and of "death with dignity." Marching close behind those who insist on the "right to die" are those who feel it would be in society's best interest to create a duty to die.

Compliance

Author: 
Arthur H. Mensch, MD
Article Type: 
Correspondence
Issue: 
January/February 2000
Volume Number: 
5
Issue Number: 
1

Dear Editor,
One of the basic tenets of American jurisprudence is that an individual is innocent until proven guilty. Lately I have come to realize this no longer applies to physicians.

Managed Care Psychosis

Author: 
Lawrence R. Huntoon, MD, PhD
Article Type: 
Medical Ethics and Managed Care
Issue: 
January/February 2000
Volume Number: 
5
Issue Number: 
1

Recently, I was asked to see a patient in neurologic consultation because he had reportedly displayed "irrational behavior." He had been admitted to the locked psych ward with a diagnosis of psychosis not otherwise specified which translates to "haven't the foggiest idea what's wrong, but I think he's crazy." He was a very pleasant, soft spoken elderly man and after I introduced myself, he sat down and calmly related the following story.

The Nazi War on Tobacco and Cancer

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Published Date: 
October 22, 2016
Article Type: 
Editor's Corner
Issue: 
November/December 2000
Volume Number: 
5
Issue Number: 
6

I was recently asked to review The Nazi War on Cancer by Robert N. Proctor for Ideas on Liberty. What follows here is a more extended critique of this scholarly but deeply disturbing book.

The Nazi War on Tobacco and Cancer

Author: 
W. Patrick Flanagan, Jr., MD, FACS
Article Type: 
Correspondence
Issue: 
Spring 2001
Volume Number: 
6
Issue Number: 
1

Dear Editor,
In your excellent review of Robert N. Proctor's book, The Nazi War on Cancer (Medical Sentinel, November/December 2000), you postulate that the drop-off in stomach cancer in the earlier 20th Century was possibly related to better methods of meat curing and preservation.

Tavistock "Shared Ethics" --- A Slippery Slope

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Editorial
Issue: 
Summer 2001
Volume Number: 
6
Issue Number: 
2

The "shared ethics" espoused by the Tavistock Group reflect a growing collectivist attitude toward medical ethics that is destroying our profession piecemeal (" 'Shared Ethics' for all providers a Quixotic quest," Internal Medicine News, March 1, 1999, p. 5).

The medical ethics of Hippocrates are based on the individual, but groups such as Tavistock embrace a collectivist morality in which individual rights take a back seat to the rights of society, government, and insurers.

A Correspondence with Bioethics Critic, Attorney Wesley J. Smith

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Editor's Corner
Issue: 
Summer 2002
Volume Number: 
7
Issue Number: 
2

March 20, 2002
Dear Mr. Smith,

The Medical Professionalism Project and its Physician Charter: New Ethics for a Political Agenda

Author: 
Jerome C. Arnett, Jr., MD, FCCP
Article Type: 
Editorial
Issue: 
Summer 2002
Volume Number: 
7
Issue Number: 
2

Changes in health care delivery threaten the values of professionalism and are tempting physicians to reject their commitment to the "primacy of patient welfare." So claims a new group, the Medical Professionalism Project, which is comprised of delegates from three medical organizations --- the American College of Physicians-American Society of Internal Medicine (ACP-ASIM) Foundation, the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Foundation, and the European Federation of Internal Medicine.

The Sharp Edge of the Soul by George Chovanes, MD

Author: 
Reviewed by Del Meyer, MD
Article Type: 
Book Review
Issue: 
Fall 2002
Volume Number: 
7
Issue Number: 
3

Neurosurgeon George Chovanes, M.D., begins his writing career with an ambitious project involving science, neurosurgery, politics and mystery. The protagonist in The Sharp Edge of the Soul is chief neurosurgical resident, Dr. Alex Adams, who is suspect of the chief of neurosurgery, Dr. Victor Todd. Todd makes philosophical comments about the perennial neurosurgeon's preoccupation with the mind-brain dilemma --- he wishes to program the mind by altering the brain. Dr. Todd is researching this with monkeys. But is he also using humans?

Medical History --- Hygiene and Sanitation

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
Winter 2002
Volume Number: 
7
Issue Number: 
4

The word hygiene comes from Hygeia, the Greek goddess of health (photo, below), who was the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine. Since the advent of the Industrial Revolution (c.1750-1850) and the discovery of the germ theory of disease in the second half of the nineteenth century, Hygeiahygiene and sanitation have been at the forefront of the struggle against illness and disease.(1)

Medical History --- Plagues and Epidemics

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
Winter 2002
Volume Number: 
7
Issue Number: 
4

Since the fall of the Western Roman Empire, there have been three major bubonic plague epidemics, which afflicted large segments of the population in the continuous Eurasian landmass and North Africa. Death quickly followed the trade routes of the times. The death toll is almost incomprehensible. The Plague of Justinian (6th Century A.D.), the Black Death (14th Century A.D.), and the Bubonic Plague (1665-1666, which coincided with the Great Fire of London) caused an estimated 137 million dead in a world much more sparsely populated than it is today.