science

The Nazi War on Tobacco and Cancer

Journal/Website: 
Medical Sentinel
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Wednesday, November 1, 2000

I was recently asked to review The Nazi War on Cancer by Robert N. Proctor for Ideas on Liberty. What follows here is a more extended critique of this scholarly but deeply disturbing book.

Public Health — From Science to Politics

Journal/Website: 
Medical Sentinel
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Monday, October 24, 2016

Public health has had a magnificent and resplendent history. Sadly, the public health establishment has strayed far from its glorious origins and has gone from a lean, effective medical discipline composed of dedicated, independent physicians and health care workers to a bloated, politicized, entrenched, bureaucracy more concerned with political agendas — and its own existence and budgets — than the public health it had been charged to protect.

"Put more water in the soup" by David C. Stolinsky, MD

Journal/Website: 
Stolinsky.com
Article Type: 
Commentary
Published Date: 
Monday, January 11, 2016

SoupI had a friend with an odd sense of humor. As he greeted guests at the door, he would yell over his shoulder to his wife, "Put more water in the soup!" Of course, there was always more than enough food. It was his way of bringing a smile to his guests' faces. But for some people, putting more water in the soup isn't a joke — it's a fact.

Glyphosate, neurological diseases — and the scientific method

Journal/Website: 
Surgical Neurology International
Article Type: 
Editorial
Published Date: 
Thursday, August 20, 2015

We must be careful not to rush to label glyphosate as excessively toxic to humans because when used properly and in proper quantities it is probably no more dangerous and toxic than other effective herbicides on the market. Unfortunately, most effective herbicides and insecticides could be classified as neurotoxic and carcinogenic because in high enough concentrations they can be toxic to biological systems.

Collectivism, secular humanism, scientific positivism (scientism) and centralized state power — Part 2: Centralization of power by Russell L. Blaylock, M.D.

Journal/Website: 
Exclusive for HaciendaPublishing.com
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Friday, August 14, 2015

The essence of all revolutionary systems and their eventual political manifestation depends on gaining, extending, and retaining power. Direct action, as we witnessed in the French Revolution and the revolutions that followed, such as National Socialism in Germany, fascism in Italy, and Soviet, Cuban, Southeast Asian and Chinese communism, brings centralized political power to the fore rapidly and necessitates equally rapid consolidation of power into the hands of the elite designers of the collectivist blueprint.

Collectivism, secular humanism, scientific positivism (scientism) and centralized state power — Part 1: A most dangerous admixture by Russell L. Blaylock, M.D.

Journal/Website: 
Exclusive for HaciendaPublishing.com
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Friday, August 14, 2015

One of the great books of the 20th century was Richard Weaver’s Ideas Have Consequences.[1] I once had a fellow medical student tell me as I was discussing the dangers of communism that it mattered little what a person believes—ideas, she informed me, were personal and benign. Weaver shatters this dangerous idea in his scholarly book. He demonstrates that it matters very much what people think because they behave and design their lives according to the ideas they hold dear.

Longevity and compression of morbidity from a neuroscience perspective: Do we have a duty to die by a certain age?

Journal/Website: 
Surgical Neurology International
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Monday, March 30, 2015
Source: 
http://surgicalneurologyint.com/surgicalint_articles/longevity-and-compression-of-morbidity-from-a-neuroscience-perspective-do-we-have-a-duty-to-die-by-a-certain-age/

Abstract — The search for longevity, if not for immortality itself, has been as old as recorded history. The great strides made in the standard of living and the advances in scientific medicine, have resulted in unprecedented increases in longevity, concomitant with improved quality of life.

Medical Ethics of Hippocrates or Population-Based Bioethics — A Symposium based on the Interview of Dr. Miguel A. Faria by Kerry Sheridan, Agence France-Presse

Journal/Website: 
Agence France-Presse
Article Type: 
Interview
Published Date: 
Thursday, May 15, 2014

This interview resulted in the May 14, 2014 article, "U.S. Experts urge focus on ethics in brain research" by Kerry Sheridan, AFP Correspondent. The article was distributed through the NewsCred Smartwire, Agence France Presse.

Kerry Sheridan, Agence France-Presse (AFP): Hi Dr. Faria, I'm working on a story about calls for consideration of ethics in neuroscience research, and I was wondering if I could interview you about your thoughts on the need for ethical oversight in neuroscience?

When Rejecting Orthodoxy Becomes a Mental Illness by Russell L. Blaylock, M.D.

Journal/Website: 
Exclusive for HaciendaPublishing.com
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Thursday, August 15, 2013

A recent article appearing in the magazine Scientific American Mind caught my attention as a perfect example as to how science (scientism) is being used to demonize those who disagree with a particular issue. The article, “What a Hoax,” appeared in the September/October 2013 issue. In fact, the article goes far beyond just demonizing dissenters of the orthodox opinion; incredibly, it classifies them as mentally ill and a danger to society. This of course reminds one of a similar methodology used in communist countries, such as the Soviet Union, Maoist China and communist Cuba.

Global Warming Debate with AAPS Response

Author: 
Donna G. Hurlock, MD
Article Type: 
Correspondence
Issue: 
September/October 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
5

Dear Editor,

Environmental Effects of Increased Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

Author: 
Arthur B. Robinson, PhD, Sallie L. Baliunas, PhD, Willie Soon, PhD, and Zachary W. Robinson
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
September/October 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
5

This article originally appeared in the Medical Sentinel 1998;3(5):171-178. It has been revised, updated, and published in the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons 2007;12(3):79-90. Copyright ©1996-2010 Association of American Physicians and Surgeons.

The following link is provided to the JPANDS.org website where the article can be viewed and/or downloaded in PDF format: www.jpands.org/vol12no3/robinson.pdf

The Perversion of Science and Medicine (Part II): Soviet Science and Gun Control

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
Spring 1997
Volume Number: 
2
Issue Number: 
2

The lessons of history clearly demonstrate to those of us who care to look that whenever science and medicine have come to be under the heavy hand of government, political pressures, or subordinated to the state, the results have been as perverse as they have been disastrous. Towards this end, I would like to share with you an egregious chapter on the perversion of science in the name of politics and ideology that has come down to us from the recent historic record.

The Perversion of Science and Medicine (Part III): Public Health and Gun Control Research

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Editor's Corner
Issue: 
Summer 1997
Volume Number: 
2
Issue Number: 
3

The 1991 American Medical Association (AMA) campaign against domestic violence (and towards gun control) launched for public relations and media consumption went hand in hand with a previously articulated (1979) U.S. Public Health Service objective of complete eradication of handguns in America, beginning with a 25% reduction in the national inventory by the year 2000!(1)

The Perversion of Science and Medicine (Part IV): The Battle Continues

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
Summer 1997
Volume Number: 
2
Issue Number: 
3

As a physician, I have always been a staunch supporter of public health in its traditional role of fighting pestilential diseases and promoting health by educating the public as to hygiene, sanitation, and preventable diseases, as alluded to in my book, Vandals at the Gates of Medicine; but I deeply resent the workings of that unrecognizable part of public health incarnated in the CDC's National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) with its politicized agenda and proclivity towards result-oriented research based on junk science.

Euthanasia, Medical Science, and the Road to Genocide

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Editor's Corner
Issue: 
May/June 1998
Volume Number: 
3
Issue Number: 
3

A momentous article, "Medical Science Under Dictatorship," by Dr. Leo Alexander, the Chief U.S. Medical Consultant at the Nuremberg War Crimes Trials, first printed in the July 14, 1949 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine, has been reprinted as a monograph, and it could not have been reprinted at a more opportune moment.

Food Additive Excitotoxins and Degenerative Brain Disorders

Author: 
Russell L. Blaylock, MD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
November/December 1999
Volume Number: 
4
Issue Number: 
6

There are a growing number of clinicians and basic scientists who are convinced that a group of compounds called excitotoxins play a critical role in the development of several neurological disorders including migraines, seizures, infections, abnormal neural development, certain endocrine disorders, neuropsychiatric disorders, learning disorders in children, AIDS dementia, episodic violence, lyme borreliosis, hepatic encephalopathy, specific types of obesity, and especially the neurodegenerative diseases, such as ALS, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, and olivo

Tacrine in the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease

Author: 
William K. Summers, MD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
January/February 2000
Volume Number: 
5
Issue Number: 
1

ABSTRACT Tacrine (1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-5-aminoacridine, THA, Cognex®) has had an interesting history since its synthesis in Australia as part of the WWII effort. In 1986, it was described in its oral form as a potential treatment for Alzheimer's disease. In 1993, it became the first FDA approved treatment for Alzheimer's, but this was not without controversy, and many practitioners believed the drug was ineffective and hepatotoxic.

The Nazi War on Tobacco and Cancer

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Published Date: 
October 22, 2016
Article Type: 
Editor's Corner
Issue: 
November/December 2000
Volume Number: 
5
Issue Number: 
6

I was recently asked to review The Nazi War on Cancer by Robert N. Proctor for Ideas on Liberty. What follows here is a more extended critique of this scholarly but deeply disturbing book.

Public Health and Gun Control --- A Review (Part I: The Benefits of Firearms)

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Editor's Corner
Issue: 
Spring 2001
Volume Number: 
6
Issue Number: 
1

Introduction --- "A Gun in the Home" 

Public Health and Gun Control --- A Review (Part II: Gun Violence and Constitutional Issues)

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Feature Article
Issue: 
Spring 2001
Volume Number: 
6
Issue Number: 
1

Gun Violence and Street Crime

Public Health --- From Science to Politics

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Editor's Corner
Issue: 
Summer 2001
Volume Number: 
6
Issue Number: 
2

Public health has had a magnificent and resplendent history. Sadly, the public health establishment has strayed far from its glorious origins and has gone from a lean, effective medical discipline composed of dedicated, independent physicians and health care workers to a bloated, politicized, entrenched, bureaucracy more concerned with political agendas --- and its own existence and budgets --- than the public health it had been charged to protect.

The Sharp Edge of the Soul by George Chovanes, MD

Author: 
Reviewed by Del Meyer, MD
Article Type: 
Book Review
Issue: 
Fall 2002
Volume Number: 
7
Issue Number: 
3

Neurosurgeon George Chovanes, M.D., begins his writing career with an ambitious project involving science, neurosurgery, politics and mystery. The protagonist in The Sharp Edge of the Soul is chief neurosurgical resident, Dr. Alex Adams, who is suspect of the chief of neurosurgery, Dr. Victor Todd. Todd makes philosophical comments about the perennial neurosurgeon's preoccupation with the mind-brain dilemma --- he wishes to program the mind by altering the brain. Dr. Todd is researching this with monkeys. But is he also using humans?

Statistical Malpractice --- 'Firearm Availability' and Violence (Part I): Politics or Science?

Author: 
Miguel A. Faria, Jr., MD
Article Type: 
Debunking Pseudoscience
Issue: 
Winter 2002
Volume Number: 
7
Issue Number: 
4

"There is a worrying trend in academic medicine which equates
statistics with science, and sophistication in quantitative procedure
with research excellence.
The corollary of this trend is a tendency to look for answers
to medical problems from people with expertise in mathematical manipulation
and information technology, rather than from people
with an understanding of disease and its causes.

Public health, social science, and the scientific method (Part II)

Journal/Website: 
Surgical Neurology (World Neurosurgery)
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Thursday, March 1, 2007
Source: 
http://www.worldneurosurgery.org/article/S0090-3019(06)01079-2/fulltext

In Part I, we discussed in general terms some of the shortcomings I encountered in many of the grant proposals submitted during my stint as a grant reviewer for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) in the years 2002-2004 [6]. There is no reason to believe that these epidemiologic and scientific shortcomings have been addressed and corrected in subsequent years.

Public health, social science, and the scientific method (Part I)

Journal/Website: 
Surgical Neurology (World Neurosurgery)
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Saturday, February 3, 2007
Source: 
http://www.worldneurosurgery.org/article/S0090-3019(06)01080-9/fulltext

During the years 2002-2004, I served in the Injury Research Grant Review Committee (IRGRC, more recently the "Initial Review Group") of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) - more specifically, the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).

Statistical Malpractice ­ 'Firearm Availability' and Violence (Part II): Poverty, Education and other Socioeconomic Factors

Journal/Website: 
NewsMax.com and Hacienda Publishing
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Monday, March 25, 2002

In Part I of this article, Politics or Science, we made some preliminary observations regarding the Harvard School of Public Health study published in the February 2002 issue of the Journal of Trauma.(1)

Statistical Malpractice ­ 'Firearm Availability' and Violence (Part I): Politics or Science?

Journal/Website: 
NewsMax.com and Hacienda Publishing
Article Type: 
Article
Published Date: 
Tuesday, March 12, 2002

"There is a worrying trend in academic medicine which equates statistics with science, and sophistication in quantitative procedure with research excellence. The corollary of this trend is a tendency to look for answers to medical problems from people with expertise in mathematical manipulation and information technology, rather than from people with an understanding of disease and its causes.



Diary of Dreams performs at the 2016 M’era Luna festival in Hildesheim, Germany. M’era Luna, “one of the biggest dark music events in Germany,” is held each year on the second weekend in August. Close to 25,000 people attend the festival annually to hear gothic, metal and industrial music performed on two large festival-style stages.